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M114 155mm Firebase Assembly Guide

 

155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) The M114A1 155mm Howitzer Crew
Description of Components

a. 2x Standing figures bending over.
b. 2x Standing figures with hands on hips.
c. 2x Loader figures holding shell.
d. 2x Standing figures covering ears.
e. 2x Standing figures with arm raised.
Assembling The M114A1 155mm Howitzer Crew
Simply arrange one of each figure type around each of the M114A1 155mm howitzer to taste. The M114A1 155mm howitzer and crew a modelled on the large six-hole bases provided in the box set.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
Description of Components
a. 4x Gun trail wheels.
b. 2x Gun shields / carriages.
c.
 2x Gun carriage stabilisers.
d. 2x Gun barrels.
e. 2x Gun trail legs.
f. 2x Gun trail spades.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) The Bases
Description of Components
3x Large six-hole bases.
Assembling The M114A1 155mm Howitzer
Step 1. Begin assembly of the M114A1 155mm howitzer by attaching the spades to the end of the gun trail legs. Below: Both spades attached to the gun trail legs. Step 2. Next, attach the gun carriage wheels to the sides of the gun shield / carriage.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
Below: Both gun carriage wheels successfully attached to the gun shield / carriage. Step 3. Next, its time to attach the gun trail legs. The back of the gun shield has been keyed to accept the gun trail legs. Below: Attaching the gun trail leg to the back of the gun shield.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
Below: Both gun trail legs successfully attached to the back of the gun shield. Step 4. Next, attach the gun carriage stabiliser to the underside of the gun shield.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
Below: The attached gun carriage stabiliser on the underside of the gun shield. Step 5. Finally, attach the gun barrel to the gun carriage.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
Below: The gun barrel attaches to the gun carriage just behind the recuperator cylinder. Below: With the gun barrel in place the M114A1 155mm howitzer is ready to be painted.
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
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M114 155mm Firebase (VUSBX10) Spotlight

 

Includes one Gun section with three M114A1 155mm howitzers with crew & three Large six-hole bases.

Development of the 155mm howitzer M1 began during the late 1930s, when the United States Army determined it needed a new medium field artillery piece to replace the World War One vintage howitzer M1917.

Check out the 155mm Field Artillery Battery in the online store here…

The 155mm used separate loading ammunition comprised of four components: a projectile, a separate bagged propellant charge, a fuse and a primer. The propelling charge contained individual bags of powder, which could be reduced depending on the range of the target. The projectiles weighed 95lb each with the fuses placed in the base of the projectile after a ring used for shipping was removed. The primers were placed in the breech of the gun for firing. The 155mm howitzer typically fired 80% or more HE (high explosive) shells, however, it could also fire smoke or white phosphorus shells.

In 1962 the designation system for artillery changed and the 155mm howitzer became known as the M114A1 155mm howitzer. The change in designation didn’t detract from its performance in any way during the course of the conflict in Vietnam.

Gun designed by Evan Allen & Seth Nash
Crew designed by Evan Allen
Painted by Mark Hazell

The M114A1 155mm Howitzers
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
The M114A1 155mm Howitzer in Flames Of War Vietnam
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10) 155mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX10)
Contact the customer service team at [email protected] if you have any issues with any of the components.
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105mm Field Artillery Battery Assemby

 

Description of Components
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) The M101A1 105mm Howitzer Crew
Description of Components

a. 2x Standing figures bending over.
b. 2x Loader figures holding shell.
c. 2x Loader figuers discarding spent shell case.
d. 2x Standing figures with arm raised.
e. 2x Standing figures with hands on hips.
Assembling The M101A1 105mm Howitzer Crew
Simply arrange one of each figure type around each of the M101A1 105mm howitzer to taste. The M101A1 105mm howitzer and crew a modelled on the large six-hole bases provided in the box set.
The M101A1 105mm Howitzer
Description of Components

a. 3x Gun trails.
b. 6x Gun trail wheels.
c. 3x Gun shields
d. 3x Gun barrels.
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) The Bases
Description of Components
2x Large six-hole bases.
Assembling The M101A1 105mm Howitzer
Step 1. Begin assembly by attaching the wheels to the gun trail. Below: The back of the gun shield has a tab that is keyed to the front of the gun trail.
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
Below: The front of the gun trail has been keyed to accept the gun shield. Step 2. Attach the gun shield to the front of the gun trail. Below: The gun trail has been keyed on either to accept the gun barrel.
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
Below: The gun barrel has been keyed to match the gun trail. Step 3. Finally, attach the gun barrel to the gun trail at the desired level of elevation. Below: With the gun barrel in place, the M101A1 105mm howitzer is ready tohit the painting table.
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
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M101 105mm Firebase (VUSBX09) Spotlight

 

includes one Gun section with three M101A1 105mm howitzers with crew & three Large six-hole bases.

The M2A1 105mm howitzer was the mainstay of the United States artillery units during World War Two. First entering production in 1941, it quickly gained a reputation for its high degree of accuracy and exceptional firepower.

Check out the 105mm Field Artillery Battery in the online store here…

Despite being developed during the 1920s, the gun didn’t enter go production due to the surplus number of World War One vintage 75mm field guns that were still in service. The project was put on hold till the United States entered World War Two in 1941. Designated as the 105mm howitzer M1, further refinements were made during the course of the war with various designations. However, in 1962 the designation system for artillery changed and the 105mm M2A1 howitzer became known as the M101A1. The change in designation didn’t detract from its performance in any way during the course of the conflict in Vietnam.

While the M101A1 howitzer has been retired by the United States military; it continues to see service with many armed forces spanning the globe.

Gun designed by Karl Cederman
Figures designed by Evan Allen
Painted by Mark Hazell

The M101A1 105mm Howitzers
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
The M101A1 105mm Howitzer in Flames Of War Vietnam
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09) 105mm Field Artillery Battery (VUSBX09)
Contact the customer service team at [email protected] if you have any issues with any of the components.
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M109 (155mm) Spotlight (VUS150)

 

Includes one M109 (155mm) Self-propelled gun with M108 (105mm) option, four Vehicle commander figures

The M108 (105mm) and M109 (155mm) are the latest self-propelled artillery pieces in the US Army. Initially the lighter M108 was preferred for its ability to carry more ammunition and the relative ease of resupply. Later they were phased out in favour of the more effective M109, as the supply problems were reduced when operating from fire support bases.

Check out the M109 (155mm) in the online store here…

Deployed in static firebases they provided long range fire support for troops put in the field as well as much needed defensive firepower when PAVN troops came out of the jungle.

Designed by Tim Adcock
Painted by Andrew Agutters

The M109 (155mm) in ‘Nam
 
The M108 (105mm) in ‘Nam
 
M109 (155mm) M109 (155mm) (VUSBX08)
M109 (155mm) M109 (155mm)
M109 (155mm) M109 (155mm)
M109 (155mm) M109 (155mm)
M109 (155mm) M109 (155mm)
Contents of the M109 (155mm) Box Set
Contact the customer service team at [email protected] if you have any issues with any of the components.
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US 4.2″ Mortar Platoon (VUS717) Spotlight

 

  includes two Mortar sections each with two M30 4.2in mortars and crew, one Small three-hole base & four Large six-hole bases.

The M30 4.2in (107mm) mortar first entered service with the United States Army in 1951 as a direct replacement for the M2 107mm mortar. Despite being twice the weight of the M2 (305kg vs. 151kg), the M30 enjoyed greater range and an increase in killing power when compared to its predecessor.

Check out the 4.2″ Mortar Platoon in the online store here…

Due to its weight, the M30 was often mounted in vehicles such as the M113 where it could offer mobile fire support to hotspots on the battlefield. When mounted on the ground, the base plate had to be dug-in and covered in sandbags in order to stabilise it. But even with these measures, the recoil caused when the weapon was fired would cause the base plate to shift therefore drastically reducing accuracy.  What’s more, rate of fire was also reduced while the crew were forced to recalibrate the sights with the aiming stakes.

In many cases these were discarded for the lighter and more mobile M29 81mm mortar to allow the platoon to accompany the battalion on combat operations.

Designed by Evan Allen
Painted by Steve London

The M30 4.2in Mortar Teams
4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717) 4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717)
The M30 4.2in Mortar in ‘Nam
4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717) 4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717)
4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717) 4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717)
4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717) 4.2" Mortar Platoon (VUS717)
Contact the customer service team at [email protected] if you have any issues with any of the components.